Reading List #4

Hello everyone, and welcome back to another edition of my reading list! Now, I skipped over one book in the process of going through my last read, and I’m ok with that.  As much as I do like sticking to lists and following a set plan from time to time, there are just some times where I’m like “alright, I can skip that one”.  And it’s not like the book isn’t on my reading list as it is, I just didn’t have the book to read it.  I’m sure it’ll show up on here again.  And speaking of, here is a very long list of books to come.  This should take me to that magical 50 books read this year.  Wish me luck!

Reminder: all covers come from Goodreads.

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Reviewing the Pages: Carved in Bone

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There is a patch of ground in Tennessee dedicated to the science of death, where human remains lie exposed to be studied for their secrets. The real-life scientist who founded the “Body Farm” has broken cold cases and revolutionized forensics . . . and now he spins an astonishing tale inspired by his own experiences.

Renowned anthropologist Dr. Bill Brockton has spent his career surrounded by death at the Body Farm. Now he’s being called upon to help solve a baffling puzzle in a remote mountain community. The mummified corpse of a young woman dead for thirty years has been discovered in a cave, the body bizarrely preserved and transformed by the environment’s unique chemistry. But Brockton’s investigation is threatening to open old wounds among an insular people who won’t forget or forgive. And a long-buried secret prematurely exposed could inflame Brockton’s own guilt—and the dangerous hostility of bitter enemies determined to see him fail . . . by any means necessary.

With Fascinating Insider Information on the Body Farm!

Jon Jefferson and Dr. Bill Bass do an amazing job of giving us some insight into the world of forensic anthropology. As Dr. Bass starts out with in the acknowledgements: “Some novels are pure fiction; others are fiction that is built on a foundation of facts. This book is of the latter type.” When my eye first looked at this book, I was intrigued. And as I dived into the pages the first time around, I was intrigued. Spellbound actually. Not only that, but I learned. And that’s a good thing for a book that is heavily steeped in science. I learned a lot about many different things about the human anatomy. And the book never makes you feel dumb about not knowing about certain things either. It comes out and explains it to you, almost as if you were sitting in with Dr. Brockton examining these bones in the middle of the Smoky Mountains in Tennessee. What the book also does is impart a fair amount of humor into the grim and macabre subject matter. Whether it’s in the form of Dr. Brockton’s incredibly lame jokes, or the humorous interactions that Dr. Brockton has, it definitely lightens the mood and keeps it from being entirely dark. The characters are well established, and they do leave a lot of growth for later on down the line.

For those of you who want to learn more about the human anatomy (after all, there is a wonderful chart of the human skeleton at the back of the paperback I read), or forensic anthropology, or just want a different than normal tale, then I recommend this read to you. I’m looking forward to getting to the next book in the series.

Ok, there’s not much more I want to expand upon my Goodreads’ review.  Each of the characters have their own unique charm about them, and I rather enjoyed diving into the mystery of Cooke County (at least, the novel version).  I stated in one of my updates on Goodreads that I enjoyed the three different plot lines that were going on.  All three of them ended up with some sort of resolution, though the bigger of the two minor plots (the one we get introduced to Dr. Brockton on), kind of leaves things hanging.

Now, I do recommend reading not only this book, but the entire series in general.  But, you don’t have to start with this book.  You can pick up any one of these books, and minus a couple of things here and there, you won’t be missing much in terms of overall character development.  Each one of the books acts independently of each other, while tying little points together here and there.  But, go out of your way to at least get introduced to Dr. Brockton, Art, Miranda, and the other cast of characters in Tennessee.

Reading List #2

Hello, and welcome back to another round of my reading list.  I finished the first one, so I figured, why not come at you guys with a second one.  So, without further delay, here’s my second list of reading.  Remember to click on the covers to go to their Goodreads page.

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There.  That should be a satisfactory list this time round and should keep me going up until May at the latest.  What do you think? Find any books that spark your fancy? Any book you think I should add to a future list? Comment below! Until next time, I am the Baumeister, and I have been, obediently yours.

Oooh, I Want to Read This #17

Hello everyone, and welcome back once again to “Oooh, I Want to Read This”! Are we ready for some more featured books? Yes? No? Maybe so? Or has life got you discombobulated that all you want to do is riot on the streets, which only adds to the problem, and is not the solution for anything.  Anyway, that aside, let’s move on to the selections today!

And as always, covers and synopsis are pulled from Goodreads.com

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A riveting historical narrative of the heart-stopping events surrounding the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and the first work of history from mega-bestselling author Bill O’Reilly

The anchor of “The O’Reilly Factor” recounts one of the most dramatic stories in American history—how one gunshot changed the country forever. In the spring of 1865, the bloody saga of America’s Civil War finally comes to an end after a series of increasingly harrowing battles. President Abraham Lincoln’s generous terms for Robert E. Lee’s surrender are devised to fulfill Lincoln’s dream of healing a divided nation, with the former Confederates allowed to reintegrate into American society. But one man and his band of murderous accomplices, perhaps reaching into the highest ranks of the U.S. government, are not appeased.

In the midst of the patriotic celebrations in Washington D.C., John Wilkes Booth—charismatic ladies’ man and impenitent racist—murders Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre. A furious manhunt ensues and Booth immediately becomes the country’s most wanted fugitive. Lafayette C. Baker, a smart but shifty New York detective and former Union spy, unravels the string of clues leading to Booth, while federal forces track his accomplices. The thrilling chase ends in a fiery shootout and a series of court-ordered executions—including that of the first woman ever executed by the U.S. government, Mary Surratt. Featuring some of history’s most remarkable figures, vivid detail, and page-turning action, “Killing Lincoln” is history that reads like a thriller.

I’ve been interested in this book ever since I first heard about it…all those many years ago.  And one of these days, I’m finally going to pick this book up and actually open it up to read it.

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A REMOTE SUMMER CAMP becomes a lurid crime scene when the bodies of two teenagers are found in a bloody, real-life rendering of a classic Grimm’s fairy tale. Trapped in the wilderness, the remaining counselors must follow a trail of dark children’s fables in order to outwit a psychopath and save the dwindling survivors before falling prey to their own gruesome endings.

Drawing on the grisly, uncensored details of history’s most famous fairy tales, Grimm Woods is a heart-pounding thriller about a deranged killer who uses traditional children’s stories as tropes in elaborate murders. Set against the backdrop of modern-day Michigan, it’s a journey through the mind of a dangerous zealot and a shocking glimpse into the bedtime stories you thought you knew.

Slasher meets fairy tales? SIGN ME UP!

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There is a patch of ground in Tennessee dedicated to the science of death, where human remains lie exposed to be studied for their secrets. The real-life scientist who founded the “Body Farm” has broken cold cases and revolutionized forensics . . . and now he spins an astonishing tale inspired by his own experiences.

Renowned anthropologist Dr. Bill Brockton has spent his career surrounded by death at the Body Farm. Now he’s being called upon to help solve a baffling puzzle in a remote mountain community. The mummified corpse of a young woman dead for thirty years has been discovered in a cave, the body bizarrely preserved and transformed by the environment’s unique chemistry. But Brockton’s investigation is threatening to open old wounds among an insular people who won’t forget or forgive. And a long-buried secret prematurely exposed could inflame Brockton’s own guilt—and the dangerous hostility of bitter enemies determined to see him fail . . . by any means necessary.

I’ve really enjoyed the entire series, and now that I have pretty much the entire series, I should probably go ahead and dive into it all, right?

That’s all I’ve got for you today folks.  Find any reads that catch your eye? Do you have any suggestions for any future reads? Thank you for stopping by.  I am the Baumeister, and I have been, obediently yours.