Video Games in 2018 (That I Can’t Wait For)

Hello everyone, I am the Baumeister, sometimes blogger, but all-time gamer.  Yes, I know that content on this blog is waning, but I’m working on it ever so slowly.  I just need to get ideas for this thing (and maybe get into book reviewing again).

BUT, that’s not why I’m here in front of you today.  I’m here…because I am a frustrated and impatient gamer.

Why am I a frustrated and impatient gamer? It’s because there’s a lot of games I want to play coming out next year, but I don’t want to wait for them.  So, instead, I’m going to share them here.  ‘Cause I can.

I’ve been playing the Devil May Cry series since high school.  DMC4 is an alright game (and I have not touched the reboot with dark haired Dante), but seeing that these three games are getting released on the PS4 makes me smile.  I started out with DMC3 Dante, then went back and played the other two, so I’m really looking forward to the nostalgia trip (even if it has already been released on the PS3).  The collection drops on PS4 and Xbox 1 on March 13, 2018.

So, while I enjoy the Pokemon games, I also am really into the Digimon series, having grown up watching Digimon over Pokemon.  So, many years after watching my last series (Frontiers), I stumbled across the current generation of Digimon video games.  This game ties into the events of Digimon World Cyber Sleuth, but serving more of a loose prequel than anything else.  I did enjoy the game, and I can’t wait to Digital Dive right back into the series.  The game is already out in Japan, but it drops January 19, 2018 in the States.

I recently played the beta for this game, and I have to say that I’m more intrigued about it now than I was just reading about it when it was announced.  Now, I’m not sure if there is more to the game than going on monster hunts, or if there’s actual story involved, but you know what, I might actually take a chance and try this game out.  From just the beta alone, the world looks gorgeous, and I was only able to scratch the surface in the isolated maps.  The game drops on January 26, 2018.

I’ve always been a fan of the Dynasty Warriors series, back from playing Dynasty Warriors 2 at a dear friend’s house when we were middle schoolers, to diving into each of the main series games as they get released across the platforms.  So, when this was (finally) announced, and that they are shifting to an open-world setting, I was completely intrigued.  Sure, this is based on a fictionalized version of real events (The Romance of the Three Kingdoms by Luo Guanzhong, written 1200 years after the events of the Three Kingdoms Era), but the games are still entertaining.  With the move to more realistic and time-period relevant weapons (instead of Guo Huai’s arm cannon, Ma Dai’s paintbrush, Zuo Ci’s Tao cards or Zhong Hui’s flying swords), and a revamped battle system that sounds like it’s going to be a little more complex than the hack and slash that the series has been known for, I’m looking forward to diving right back into the end of the Han era.  The game drops February 13, 2018.

Last game on this list is this mind-trip of a game.  When I first saw it during the Microsoft E3 2016 press conference, I was instantly hooked on wanting to play this game, but saddened because I didn’t own the Xbox One console (Playstation guy for life).  So, after reading through an IGN article about upcoming horror/suspense games, I was shocked to see that this game was coming to the PS4.  The game centers around drug-fueled government oppression, and I’m getting ever so anxious in this game’s release date.  The game releases on April 13, 2018.

There, that’s all I’ve got for you today.  I would include the Final Fantasy VII remake, or Kingdom Hearts 3, but I don’t know if those games are going to be released in 2018, or not.  Until next time, I am the Baumeister, and I have been…obediently yours.

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Blogger Recognition Award!

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Hello everyone! I was nominated for the Blogger Recognition Award by Beth @ Betwixt the Pages. Thank you Penguin!

I know I haven’t been as active around here lately, and that’s because I haven’t been reading as fast as I was.  I don’t quite know what caused it. But, I’m hoping that things I’m working on will help get myself going on here again soon.  I’m going to blame work for a lot of it.  I work a very fair amount, and it’s rather draining especially with opening the sandwich shop in store last week.

Rules:

  • Thank the blogger who nominated you and provide a link to their blog.
  • Write a post to show your award.
  • Give a brief story of how your blog started.
  • Give two pieces of advice to new bloggers.
  • Select 15 other bloggers you’d like to give this award to.
  • Comment on each blog and let them know you’ve nominated them, providing a link to the post you’ve created. (Please make sure you do this step! Otherwise they won’t know you’ve tagged them.)

How I Started

I started blogging quite a while ago, primarily as a pro wrestling information dump.  Since then, I transitioned away from that into book blogging, but I’m dabbling back into my roots, working on some projects that nobody else may find fascinating, but it interests me.  I’ll still be doing book reviews, but they just won’t be as frequent as they have been.

Advice

  1. Never give up.  Whether it’s reading, or trying to produce content, don’t give up on it.  Seriously.  It may be a time drain, and there might be times that you just don’t have anything, but keep at it.  Success doesn’t come from inactivity.
  2. Hand in hand with #1, do whatever you want! If you want to gush over the recent steamy romance novel that you read, then gush your heart out.  If you want to try to wrap your mind around the complex themes in a political thriller, then lay out your thought process.  If, you’re like me, and want to release trivial bits of information that only appeals to a certain niche audience, then go for it.  Do whatever speaks to you, not what people want you to.  You’ll be much happier for it!

TAG!…

I’m not gonna tag anyone (frankly, I don’t know a whole lot of people that are active on here anymore.  Me for the fail).

Thanks for reading everyone! I’ll be back with new content soon! Until then, as today is Thanksgiving, Happy Thanksgiving! And, as always, I have been the Baumeister, and I have been, obediently yours.

Reviewing the Pages: The Wheel of Ice

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Aboard the Wheel mining facility around Saturn, Dr Who #2, Jamie and Zoe see blue dolls who look like their landlady Mayor Laws’ baby Casey. Power-hungry Administrator Florian Hart accuses rebel teens of sabotage. The mystery goes back to the creation of the solar system, and could kill them all.

It’s never a good thing when the TARDIS takes charge and ends up taking the Doctor and his merry band of companions along for the ride. The current issue: it’s a disturbance in time, and it’s up to the Doctor, Zoe and Jamie to figure out why.

I have to say that I rather enjoyed this tale. Sure, the Doctor doesn’t play too much of a role in this tale, but, we’re usually following along with either Zoe or Jamie, which is also interspersed with interludes that deal with a wide variety of back story. Which, I love in this instance. While the story goes right along its merry way, the interludes provide background into certain characters and key objects in the story.

Now, I’m not well versed in the realm of Classic Who, but I do have to say that I have, at the very least, a passing familiarity not only with the Second Doctor, but also his current traveling companions. But, I can’t forget about the characters of Jo, Phee, and Sam; who this story kind of revolves around, in a way. Then, there’s Florian, who’s motivation is driven by greed and revenge, and she will stop at nothing to get her way.

All in all, I really enjoyed this read. I loved the alien setting within the Rings of Saturn; enjoyed all of my friendly characters (yes, that includes reading through the Scottish of Jamie and MMAC); and enjoyed the story unfold throughout the pages. Just be careful when venturing out with the Doctor in this one; space is dangerous.

I’m getting rusty with these reviews, I need to pick the pace back up.

Anyway, the one thing I really want to talk about here is Arkive.  I’m only mostly sure that Arkive is a ship, or at least a ship’s intelligence, and not an actual being.  There’s no way that a being could live for billions upon billions of years.  Which makes what exactly Arkive is rather fuzzy.  It has a want…a desire to go back to where (and when) it came, but its attempts are futile and proving to be far more difficult that it realizes.

I love the alienness of our setting.  It has both man-made elements to it in terms of the space debris that turned up, and the rest of the natural setting of Saturn and her moons.  Whether it was within the rings, or on Titan, I rather enjoyed the uniqueness of each area.

Sorry I’m not able to get into more.  I really don’t want to spoil anymore, and some of the more important centers of my brain are shutting down for the evening (it’s almost midnight at the time I’m writing this). So, I leave you this.  You should read this.  Sure, there’s more focus on the companions than the Doctor, but it works out in the book’s favor.  Enjoy the characters and the setting, and who knows, you just might be able to help Arkive.

Reviewing the Pages: In a Dark, Dark Wood

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What should be a cozy and fun-filled weekend deep in the English countryside takes a sinister turn in Ruth Ware’s suspenseful, compulsive, and darkly twisted psychological thriller.

Sometimes the only thing to fear…is yourself.

When reclusive writer Leonora is invited to the English countryside for a weekend away, she reluctantly agrees to make the trip. But as the first night falls, revelations unfold among friends old and new, an unnerving memory shatters Leonora’s reserve, and a haunting realization creeps in: the party is not alone in the woods.

From the very beginning, this book draws you in and leaves you wondering “what’s going on?”, but in a good way. This book leaves you in suspense, always leaving two questions when one gets answered. With such a remote setting to add to the chills, it takes well placed reveals, as well as doubts into the narrator’s own reliability that make this a wonderful read. Sure, there will be a character or two that annoy you, and a couple of scenes that would make the reader feel uncomfortable (I know I was), but don’t let those pieces take away from the overall scene. Take a dive into this book, fellow reader, and beware, not everyone is what they appear to be.

Before I begin, hi everyone.  I’m back.  September is probably going to be a rough month for me for the foreseeable future, so I do apologize in advance if I suddenly and randomly disappear.  Plus, starting a book that requires A LOT of focus on didn’t help matters (seriously, when one of the SIXTEEN POVs is a character with the name of Hajjaj, one has to question their reading choices).  So, here I am.  Thank you for being patient with me, and thanks for sticking around.

Anyway, on with the book.  This is a marvelous read.  If you’re anything like me, you won’t be able to put it down.  The book wastes no time in throwing you into the mystery, and continues to bring you into it little by little.  With every new piece of the puzzle revealed, it draws you further in, and at times, further away from the truth.

I mentioned in my review above that it would make you feel uncomfortable.  Well, one of the big parts of the plot is about love, and the effects that it can have on a person, even a decade after the fact.  And, during this hen party, the trivia session that took place in the car made me feel rather uncomfortable, because I could see myself in Nora’s shoes (granted, in a reversed sort of situation, but you catch my drift).

This book also makes great use of the unreliable narrator, but in a way that makes it perfect for the plot.  While most unreliable narrators that we get are that way from the beginning, we get that sense towards the middle of the read, and it provides to be more of a way to drive the plot along than a hindrance (like some other unreliable narrators that I know The Girl on the Train *coughcough*). In fact, like The Girl on the Train, there’s a character in this book that I couldn’t stand, but instead of it being the MC this time; it’s the maid of honor and thrower of the disastrous hen party, Flo.  I could not be sympathetic towards her, especially before we got to all of the reveals.

There, that’s all I’ve got.  Seriously, go check out this read.  Dive within the pages, and let the mystery unfold for you.  Just, keep on your toes.  You don’t know who you can trust.

Reviewing the Pages: The Silence of the Lambs

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Hannibal Lecter. The ultimate villain of modern fiction. Read the five-million-copy bestseller that scared the world silent… A young FBI trainee. An evil genius locked away for unspeakable crimes. A plunge into the darkest chambers of a psychopath’s mind– in the deadly search for a serial killer… Thomas Harris is the author of Hannibal , Red Dragon , and Black Sunday . As part of the search for a serial murderer nicknamed “Buffalo Bill,” FBI trainee Clarice Starling is given an assignment. She must visit a man confined to a high-security facility for the criminally insane and interview him. 

I’ve forgotten just how fast this book starts out, and it never lets up. Information comes at the reader fast and furious, and leaves out just enough information to leave the pieces untied. Sure, the reader knows what the picture looks like before the cast of good guys (certain characters not-withstanding of course). For those of you who haven’t been introduced into the cold, calculating mind of the pure sociopath Dr. Lecter, this is a fantastic introduction into a character (that is, if you decided to skip over Red Dragon, which this book references a few times, but it not a necessity to get involved in this story). I highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys a good suspenseful read, with a lot of detective work involved as well. But, be careful. One never knows when Lecter might get into your head.

I want to make note of something that I found interesting.  Now, I haven’t seen it happen often (possibly because I don’t actually realize it), but the last line of this book contains the title.  In fact, the title is the last five words of the story.  It’s rather interesting, and I may have to be on the lookout for more of those interesting title tie-ins somehow.

Anywho, as I said in my Goodreads review, there is a lot of information that gets thrown right in our face.  In fact, we get our first meeting between Starling and Lecter only 15 pages in, and boy do we get a lot of information.  At times, it’s enough to make a man’s head spin.  But, at other times, we are only given just enough information that may be overlooked at the time, but helps to add to the big final reveal.

Then, there’s Lecter.  He’s absolutely terrifying here.  Here’s a man who kills without remorse, nor does it excite him any.  He just…kills.  And to top it all off, he uses his vast intellect to outwit everyone.  There’s a reason why Hannibal is an iconic character not just in the world of ink and paper, but the big screen as well (thanks to Sir Anthony Hopkins for his amazing portrayal).  And we can’t forget about his opposite here, Clarice Starling.  Starling is a strong character, who gets pulled into this case based on her skill set, and stays in it until the bitter end.  She stands up for what she believes in, and she doesn’t pull any punches when it comes to people that cross her (I don’t want to be that cameraman that she dropped the garage door on).

I highly recommend this to anyone who enjoys thrillers with some elements of horror and mystery.  But just remember, not everyone wants to invite you for dinner.  Some might want you FOR dinner…or wear you to dinner.

Reviewing the Pages: The Lodestone Files: The Things in the Shadows

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Idris Sinclair lives a rather typical life; helping his family run their cherished diner. However, all the normalness he knows in life is about to go straight out the window when he happens to break into an abandoned van in the restaurant’s parking lot. He discovers a small weapon’s stockpile and various files, involving affairs foreign to him. 

As night begins to set in, the family is involved in one of our government’s most heinous and dastardly secrets involving entities, not of this world. 

It walks among us. It could be anyone—or anything. Suspect everyone you know, or you pass on the street. There is nowhere where you are safe. Run all you want; it will only make you taste more delicious to it. 

It’s too late. It already knows where you are. 

It’s. Here.

Much too short! That’s what I think about this story. There’s so much here that we are given in terms of information, and it leaves us so many answers. What exactly are these creatures? Why are there people watching them? What is going to happen to the boys? Etc, etc. McCartney starts off with a lot of atmosphere, letting us get connected to the characters, and then, pulls the rug out from beneath us during the meatiest part of the story.

I really want to learn more about this world! I hope that McCartney has more plans to dive into this world in the future. It might be short, but it packs a punch, and I highly recommend this to any avid reader.

No spoiler alert today, because this is just too short, and I’ve pretty much said what I wanted to in the Goodreads review above.  Seriously.  Go check this read out.  I got my copy through InstaFreebie, but I cannot state enough that I loved this read.  Go find it.  Check it out.  Trust me, you’ll enjoy it, and want more.

Reviewing the Pages: Reliquary

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Hidden deep beneath Manhattan lies a warren of tunnels, sewers, and galleries, mostly forgotten by those who walk the streets above. There lies the ultimate secret of the Museum Beat. When two grotesquely deformed skeletons are found deep in the mud off the Manhattan shoreline, museum curator Margo Green is called in to aid the investigation. Margo must once again team up with police lieutenant D’Agosta and FBI agent Pendergast, as well as the brilliant Dr. Frock, to try and solve the puzzle. The trail soon leads deep underground, where they will face the awakening of a slumbering nightmare… in Reliquary, from bestselling coauthors Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

Following the events of Relic, this book follows some of main survivors of the incidents at the Museum as they follow a new threat that takes the fear from the Museum beast and spreads it around the deep underground of the New York tunnel system.

For me, it felt like there were too many stories in this one to follow. Sure, we had many different characters that eventually converged their storylines into one, but there felt like too many to worry about. The main story was enjoyable, and I felt like there could have been more done with Kawakita, but the story gave us enough information at the right time. I wasn’t a big fan of what they were doing with Smithback with the Take Back Our City rally that devolved into a riot. I felt that it wasn’t right for the story.

The action will keep you motivated, and every new reveal will keep you guessing. Sure, it’s not super stellar, but it will keep you entertained until the epilogue. For those of you who like mysteries tinged with science, you should check this, and Relic out.

So, I left out Frock for a reason.  Yes, it was a good twist that Frock is found out to be the main villain, and there may have been hints that it was him throughout the tale, but the whole reveal fell just a little flat.  It was just “Oh…Doctor Frock?!”, and that was it.  Sure, the motivation (stated afterwards) was there.  A man that has been crippled for most of his life is practically gifted the ability to walk again, with some…side effects.  Granted, the drug that has been extracted could very well be part of the problem, or it can only have enhanced the mental strain because of his jealousy of being confined to a wheelchair.  Who can really say for certain?

We do get a lot of new characters mixed in with the old.  Some, like Hayward, are fleshed out and given some life here.  Others, like Snow and Mrs. Wisher, are rather one-dimensional, and I hope that we aren’t going to get them back in a future book.  Which concerned me a little bit.  Both characters are rather instrumental in the plot, yet, they have little depth to them.  I do want to like Snow, but at the same time, there’s not much there.  At all.  There were some characters that we got introduced to that I was really glad to see go because I found their personality to be rather grating, yet there are some that still stuck around to the very end.

You should schedule this one into your busy reading schedules, fellow reader.  Reading Relic can be very helpful to you here, but not necessarily a requirement.  Dive underground into the New York City labyrinth.  You’ll never know what sort of mysteries you’ll uncover.